operativesurprise
operativesurprise:

stevia-badger:

molecularbiologistproblems:

No, your pumpkin spice latte won’t kill you. Here’s why:

50 grams of sugar is far from insignificant, though.

Here. All my pumpin spice worshiping friends can feel safe. (though who in their right mind would thing these drinks were dangerous?)

Meh. I don’t know if the counter-argument info graphic actually corresponds to real affected consumer behavior (ie; pumpkin spice buys switching or going without). Seems mostly like a PSA to counter social media viral low-rent Jenny McCarthy’s and chemophobes. Probably the same folks who are indiscriminately anti-corporate and thus don’t choose Starbucks anyway. Sci comm is a bit like Jon Stewart vs Fox News. Necessary and tiresome, since there is no real dialogue.

operativesurprise:

stevia-badger:

molecularbiologistproblems:

No, your pumpkin spice latte won’t kill you. Here’s why:

50 grams of sugar is far from insignificant, though.

Here. All my pumpin spice worshiping friends can feel safe. (though who in their right mind would thing these drinks were dangerous?)

Meh. I don’t know if the counter-argument info graphic actually corresponds to real affected consumer behavior (ie; pumpkin spice buys switching or going without).

Seems mostly like a PSA to counter social media viral low-rent Jenny McCarthy’s and chemophobes. Probably the same folks who are indiscriminately anti-corporate and thus don’t choose Starbucks anyway.

Sci comm is a bit like Jon Stewart vs Fox News. Necessary and tiresome, since there is no real dialogue.

scientificillustration
joerojasburke:

But seriously, how quickly could a giant sauropod dinosaur react to an attack on a body part 150 feet from its brain? The excellent blog SV-POW! has the answer:

… sauropods really did have individual sensory nerve cells that ran from their extremities (tip of tail, soles of feet)–and from the rest of their skin–to their brainstems. In the longest sauropods, these cells were probably something like 150 feet long, and may have been the longest cells in the history of life. We haven’t found any fossils of these nerves and almost certainly never will, but we can be sure that sauropods had them because all vertebrates do, from hagfish on up. That’s just how we’re built. So how long does it take to send a nerve impulse 150 feet? The fastest nerve conduction velocities are in the neighborhood of 120 meters per second, so a signal from the very tip of the tail in a 150-foot sauropod would take about half a second to reach the brain…[continue reading]

Cartoon by Ed McLachlan, Punch magazine, 1981

joerojasburke:

But seriously, how quickly could a giant sauropod dinosaur react to an attack on a body part 150 feet from its brain? The excellent blog SV-POW! has the answer:

… sauropods really did have individual sensory nerve cells that ran from their extremities (tip of tail, soles of feet)–and from the rest of their skin–to their brainstems. In the longest sauropods, these cells were probably something like 150 feet long, and may have been the longest cells in the history of life. We haven’t found any fossils of these nerves and almost certainly never will, but we can be sure that sauropods had them because all vertebrates do, from hagfish on up. That’s just how we’re built. So how long does it take to send a nerve impulse 150 feet? The fastest nerve conduction velocities are in the neighborhood of 120 meters per second, so a signal from the very tip of the tail in a 150-foot sauropod would take about half a second to reach the brain…[continue reading]

Cartoon by Ed McLachlan, Punch magazine, 1981